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17 Jan 2019

RÉSEAU DES SADC ET CAE WELCOMES NEWLY CREATED FEDERAL MINISTRY OF RURAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

QUÉBEC, January 17, 2019 - The Réseau des SADC et CAE applauds Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s announcement of the newly created Ministry of Rural Economic Development, and the appointment of Bernadette Jordan as its head. The formation of this ministry meets a real need and will bolster aid to small municipalities so that they can address their specific issues as quickly as possible.

 

“I would like to congratulate the federal government for creating the new ministry,” said Daniel Dumas, president of the Réseau des SADC et CAE. “This move shows that the government prioritizes support for development in small communities that are in dire need of assistance. I would also like to welcome the new minister, Bernadette Jordan. We are thrilled at the idea of collaborating with her and her team.”

 

For over 35 years, the SADC et CAE in Quebec have pursued economic development in rural and semi-urban communities throughout the province, serving nearly 4.3 million residents. Our organizations implement solutions that align with the main economic challenges of rural areas, such as internet access, labour shortages, the decline in local services and population retention.

 

Like the Prime Minister, we believe that the challenges faced by Canadians living in rural settings are very different from those faced in urban areas. We are overjoyed by the plan to create a rural development strategy that aims to encourage economic growth and the creation of jobs in these communities.

 

“As the Right Honourable Justin Trudeau correctly noted, this economic growth is contingent upon citizens’ and companies’ ability to access high-speed internet, and small businesses desperately need help on that front. How can they be expected to be successful and competitive if they don’t have basic services? We need to act immediately,” said Mr. Dumas.

 

The SADC et CAE develop concrete measures that are adapted to help communities respond to their challenges. Every year, we work with over 10,000 businesses to support their ongoing success, and we back over 1,000 local projects to keep our communities competitive and attractive. These projects contribute to growth that meets community needs and directly results in the creation and maintenance of high-quality jobs

 

ABOUT THE RÉSEAU DES SADC ET CAE
The Réseau des SADC (Sociétés d’aide au développement des collectivités) et CAE (Centres d’aide aux entreprises) is a network of 57 SADC and 10 CAE that have been working in community economic development for more than 35 years. It is made up of over 1,400 professionals and volunteers who support and provide funding to more than 10,000 entrepreneurs and local economic development projects every year.

 

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Stay connected

Follow the Réseau on Twitter: @ReseauSADCCAE

 

For information:

 

Christine Pilote

Director, Communications

Réseau des SADC et CAE

Phone: 581‑999‑6363

cpilote@ciril.qc.ca

 

 

Hélène Deslauriers

Executive Director
Réseau des SADC et CAE

Phone: 418‑658‑1530

18 Oct 2018

BUSINESSES SUPPORTED BY SADC ET CAE CONTINUE TO HAVE BETTER SURVIVAL RATES, ACCORDING TO STATISTICS CANADA

Statistics Canada has released its eighth report on the performance of the Community Futures Program (CFP), which is delivered by SADC et CAE in Quebec. It confirms the findings of previous studies that businesses who work with SADC et CAE in Quebec have better survival rates, create over twice as many jobs, and more rapidly increase their payroll and sales. Notably, there was a seven-percentage-point increase this year in the five-year survival rate of businesses. The rate was 87% for our clients, compared to 53% for businesses in the control group.

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12 Oct 2018

THE CAE RIVE-NORD SECURES FUNDING TO REVITALIZE THE RCM OF ARGENTEUIL TERRITORY

ARGENTEUIL (Quebec), October 11, 2018 - The CAE Rive-Nord and the Réseau des SADC et CAE are pleased to announce the addition of new funding to support the revitalization of the RCM of Argenteuil’s territory. The CAE will use this funding of at least $140,000 from the Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) for a pilot project to open a point of service in Lachute and to hire a professional to serve as a resource person for the territory.

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10 Jul 2018

LAC-MEGANTIC...FIVE YEARS LATER

SPECIAL INTERVIEW: LAC-MÉGANTIC...FIVE YEARS LATER

INTERVIEW WITH GINETTE ISABEL, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF SADC DE LA RÉGION DE MÉGANTIC


On July 6, 2013, an unprecedented train wreck rocked the town of Lac-Mégantic. A massive explosion and fire destroyed the downtown, killing 47 people, more than half of them under the age of 40. The Lac-Mégantic region was a model for the coordination of economic development stakeholders, with one of the most beautiful and vibrant downtowns in Quebec.

 

Réseau -  Ginette, the SADC played a major role in the aftermath of the disaster. Looking back, what were the most difficult moments?

G.I. -  After making sure that my family, board members and team members were all still alive, the most difficult thing was how totally disorganized everything was. The SADC had lost everything and didn’t have the tools to help people. The feeling of powerlessness was overwhelming, and we at the SADC quickly got to work in order to reassure those most affected by showing them a semblance of normalcy.

Réseau - Your region was famous for how well-coordinated stakeholders were. How is it now?

G.I. - In the first few months, all the organizations instinctively formed a united front. We got together every morning to coordinate our actions and share tasks. This is what helped us get through it all. After Mayor Laroche left, the municipal council changed. There wasn’t enough time to consult the organizations, and they made some controversial decisions. During this time, the organizations felt the need to stand out again and act more individually. This was a difficult time. It became clear that collaboration had broken down. There’s more of it now, however. People want to feel that unity again.

Réseau - After five years, what are the most significant consequences?

G.I. - How people are still feeling vulnerable, which makes them insecure and afraid of investing and getting involved. Then there’s the loss of our downtown, which we prided ourselves on. Two weeks before the tragedy, I had reviewed our facade renovation program and was happy to say that there were only three buildings left to redo... None of the downtown buildings withstood it. Both residents and tourists say that we have lost our soul. They are disappointed that the new buildings don’t have the same charm. I wouldn’t have believed it could affect us so much.

Réseau - Were there any positives in all these events?

G.I. - Of course! Definitely the most significant is how many of Lac-Mégantic’s young people have returned. They felt the sense of urgency and wanted to help. As well, the media coverage in the first few months helped us raise several million dollars to aid the victims. And I want to acknowledge Canada Economic Development (CED), which has provided exceptional financial assistance and technical support. The $5 million in recovery funds for Lac-Mégantic enabled us to help businesses relocate, and there will soon be new buildings on Frontenac Street thanks to this funding.

Réseau - How is the region’s economy doing these days ?

G.I. -The commercial sector is still struggling, as it was the most affected, but the industrial sector is doing well. CED also supported them. Although it was previously thought that everything would be done in three years, it will take at least ten years to rebuild Lac-Mégantic.

Réseau - Ginette, you are going to be leaving the SADC in a few months. What gives you hope and pride with regard to these events?

G.I. -The removal of the railway will be a fantastic opportunity to redevelop the town centre so that it regains some of its charm. My greatest sources of pride are having really made a difference for the victims and a sense of accomplishment.

 

Papineau Street, Photo credit: Claude Grenier